CSP publishes a survey design for monitoring global environmental change

CSP publishes a survey design for monitoring global environmental change

CSP’s Dave Theobald published a paper in the September 2016 issue of Remote Sensing describing a project that has significant implications for collaborative and citizen science.

The paper recaps Theobald’s work designing a general-purpose spatial survey for monitoring environmental changes on a global scale. The primary product of this project is a massive database — the “Global Grid”— that maps all locations across the globe (at resolutions down to about 1 square kilometer) with a randomized sequence number. CSP is currently using the Grid for several projects, including one that entails generating a global dataset for land use and land cover validation.

The Global Grid has several unique features. Its design is not only probability based, but it is also flexible, multi-scale, and globally comprehensive. The Grid builds on previous work of the U.S. EPA and others. Its design is intended to both optimize and standardize sampling locations for environmental monitoring, for a variety of resource types, for application across institutional and administrative boundaries. It is available in a variety of open-source formats.

To learn more about this project, read “A General-Purpose Spatial Survey Design for Collaborative Science and Monitoring of Global Environmental Change: The Global Grid.”

A sample design of the Global Grid for land use/cover, stratified on an urban to rural gradient generated from “nightlights” imagery from 2013

A sample design of the Global Grid for land use/cover, stratified on an urban to rural gradient generated from “nightlights” imagery from 2013